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moderator of "meet the press" with us from our washington newsroom tonight. so, david, give us a viewer's guide to what we're seeing here. >> this is really an attempt by the obama campaign to talk about what it wants to talk about, and that is mitt romney's time as head of bain capital. why? because they would not like to talk about the jobs report right now and the tough economy. they want to talk about mitt romney as a very wealthy person who ran a venture capital firm and put the onus on him to explain whether he was involved in outsourcing of jobs, keep up the pressure about whether bain was exploiting workers and companies. really to make the case to middle class voters that mitt romney is not on their side and president obama is. that's the argument. that's why they want the attention here and why they'll focus on this period of time of just what mitt romney was doing when he was filing papers to the s.e.c. saying he was still the chairman even though he says as you just heard he had no operational involvement. >> all right. david gregory, we will look for you sunday morning on "
minutes. >> thank you, orval, and senator for joining us today for our conversation about ian bremmer's wonderful new book. this book is about the g-0 world. he is a fabulous political scientist who really speaks to the big major changes underway in the world today, getting beyond the ivory tower. he has been making some money, which come as a fellow political scientist, i think this is a great tribute, but it also shows how politics and government are really driving so much of the global economy, so that the economists knowledge is really not sufficient, even for investors, as well as ordinary citizens to understand where we are going. this book is very interesting, we have this new concept of the g-0 world. it is really about the problem of global cooperation. it is not so much a book about the competition among nations. it is about the kind of leadership in the world today. i wanted to start off they may be telling us you really think that the united states has been an effective leader up until now, and that it is really -- it is really a loss of american leadership that this book
inside. it was -- imagine, it was such a tense situation for all of us. our life was at risk, but what women did, we decided that we are going to continue to stay in the jerga because it was for three three days. we took the risk and we didn't know what was going to happen next, the second day, the third day and we had to actually face the challenge of actually fighting with our families. >> i was going say -- >> because my mother was telling me, don't go, you are going to kill yourself. don't go, but i think peace is so important for all of us, but we are contributing in afghanistan. we are already working very hard and, yes, we are risking our lives and we are proud of what we are doing. thank you very much. >> and you've also been able to get women into these major conferences, too. >> right. >> is it hard for them when they go back home from these conferences? are families proud or is there some retribution? do they get criticized when they go back? >> at first from family to family in afghanistan because culturally i always use the word diverse -- we are so much diverse.
to be one held of a disappointment. that's all for us tonight. >>> from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, this is early start weekend. an unannounced visit to afghanistan and an impact for troop withdrawal. plus, like a scene from "jaws," the hunt is on to find the sharks before they claim a human life. >>> blame it on the meat. that's what one olympic coach is doing. is one team's diet behind their losses in key contests? >>> it is saturday, july 7th. good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. glad you are waking up with us. chances are after you turned on cnn you logged into your computer to do surfing and check your e-mail. come monday, it may not be possible. it turns out there's a nasty virus out there. hundreds of thousands of computers are affected around the world. that means you may not have internet access monday morning. the fbi plans to shut down services to fix it. the scope doesn't matter if you are one of the unlucky ones. what will you do without your internet if you lose it monday? how will you spend your time? can you remember what life was like without it? tweet me@randyk
to afghanistan's future. >> that designation paves the way for the u.s. and afghanistan to maintain defense long aft u.s. troop withdrawal. secretary clinton is on her way to tokyo. in japan, she'll ask international donors to pledge their support to afghanistan. joining me on the phone from kabul is john wendell, a photographer and time magazine correspondent. how significant is this announcement? >> caller: hi. thanks for having me. i think secretary clinton's use of the word symbol is the keyword here. the enduring partnership was signed on may 2nd between the u.s. and afghanistan. the major non-nato ally announcement was part of that. the announcement, i think, is not so significant when it comes to the day-to-day of the war. what i think it is doing is helping lay the fears o afghanistan's elite that will be abandoned ahead of the 2014 u.s. withdrawal of nato forces and part of an effort to push the taliban back. i think the main reason for the announcement was so the u.s. can point to a concrete move showing its commitment ahead of the tokyo conference you mentioned tomorrow. as part of an
ten years when the u.s. first after september 11th invaded afghanistan. i don't know, some of you are too young to remember, but others of us might remember looking at our tv screens and seeing the pictures of these very fancy, new weapons that we had. this idea that we know had these precision weapons that would only target the people that we wanted to get and would not result in collateral damage. and it was almost a way to say to people, calmed down, don't be worried. we will be killing innocent people. so, i was worried because i don't have as sense that the latest and greatest new weapon is going to protect innocent people and went to afghanistan three weeks after the invasion with several other colleagues. it was before we even got into afghanistan on the border of pakistan that we found already people who would be considered collateral damage. the first young woman i met is somebody who sticks with me because she looked like my daughter. she was 13 years old. my daughter at that time was 13 years old. i felt an affinity with her and asked her if i could learn about her stor
executive arnie gundersen about the report and what it means for u.s. plants. then a look at serious operations in africa and how the united states rendered, tortured and discarded one innocent man from tanzania. and protests against the u.s. mining giant newmont are escalating in peru. five participants in those protests have been killed in the past week. a state of emergency has been declared. >> the government is mistaken if it thinks it is going to crash the justified cries of the people. >> we will speak with amy goodman in spain today, 75 years after the bombing of that city. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm juan gonzalez. i am filling in for amy goodman. the u.s. and european union are calling for new sanctions on syria similar to those used against the gaddafi regime ahead of the nato attack on libya. at an international friends of syria gathering in paris, secretary of state clinton invoked the threat of chapter 7 under the u.n. charter, which ranges from economic embargos to military force. the news co
>> greg: true. >> kimberly: thank you for spending time with us. tune in tomorrow for the fabulous fourth of july special. west point hell cat, dunk tank and wings. you don't want to mess it. see you back here tomorrow. ♪ >> john: another u.s. apology. this is "special report." ♪ ♪ >> john: good evening. i'm john roberts in for bret baier. pakistan in the seven-month long blockade in the boarder with afghanistan that cost the american taxpayer $2 billion. it took an american apology which the pentagon and the administration have said for months would not be forthcoming. national security correspondent jennifer griffin has details. >> reporter: the apology came from hillary clinton in a phone call to pakistan foreign minister. "we are sorry for the losses suffered by pakistani military. we are committed to working closely to pakistan and afghanistan to prevent this from ever happening again." for seven months, the white house, state department and pentagon said they would not apologize for the cross-border shooting incident on novembe november 26 that left 24 pakistani troops
>>> the road to kabul. pakistan agrees to reopen the supply routes to afghanistan. u.s. and pakistani leaders have come to agreement that will help nato soldiers to wrap up the mission in afghanistan. they agreed to reopen the routes to pakistan. the u.s. uses the roads to bring in goods and fuel. secretary of state hillary clinton discussed the details over the phone with the pakstani foreign minister. >> the foreign minister karr has advised her the ground lines of communication will be reopening. >> u.s. troops in afghanistan killed 24 pakistani soldiers in error last november in a cross-border air strike. pakistani blocked the supply routes. clinton offered an apology and expressed the condolences to the families of the dead soldiers. the islamic extremist group, the pakistani taliban criticized the agreement. members threat tuned attack u.s. convoys. nato leaders said the agreement demonstrates strengthened cooperation between their forces and pakistan. the signed treaties with other central asian countries to provide access into afghanistan, but those roadways pro
assistance and no u.s. dollars and there were global fund dollars available for hiv and the prospects of her living and what she's doing now in her community because those dollars are at work there in her community are tremendous. there are 5.5 million people approximately in the world in low and middle income countries that receive hiv treatment and are on retrovirals because of foreign assistance programs funded by the united states and by other donor countries and especially the global fund. when we asked the question getting back to the title of the panel, to aid or not to aid. do i think we have to aid? yes, i think we have to aid. it is in the best interest as a country and it is our right and our responsibility as one of the world's global leaders. is it -- could it be more effective? absolutely. should we fund more? i think so, but right now we're living in a time in history where the world is changing more than ever before and millions of people still live in extreme poverty. we know that extreme poverty and social and economic conditions breed fear, hopelessness and terror, frankly
the farm bill and it already passed the u.s. senate and a scheduled vote wednesday on a repeal of the affordable care act known as obama care following the ruling last week by the supreme court. it is sunday, july 8 and will begin with our focus on u.s. foreign policy and hillary clinton who is in tokyo today for a series of talks on the u.s./nato role in afghanistan or the next decade. will get your calls and comments about u.s. foreign policy generally and the performance of the secretary of state, hillary clinton specifically. our phone lines are open -- you can join the conversation on our twitter page and facebook. or send us an e-mail. there are a couple of articles related to the secretary of state and this one is from cbs news. she beat the former record held by madeleine albright. there is this from "the l.a. times." she was asked about corruption in the country. she said it is a major challenge to meet the standards of accountability and transparency. the exchange came during this unannounced stopover by the secretary of state. even if her words or encouraging, many i
the u.s. taxpayer estimated $2.1 billion to fly supplies needed by u.s. and nato troops through the northern central asian corridor. truck convoy backed up at the border were attacked. pakistanis close the c.i.a. air base used for drone strikes and demanded $5,000 per vehicle that passed through the border. so what changed? pakistani dropped fees for each truck passing through the border and the u.s. apologize u.s. apologized. some say pakistan gained more from the break through. >> it has been able to obtain the u.s. apology, obtain that relations have improved between the two countries without takes those difficult steps of going after the sanctuary, getting the taliban to play a positive role of reconciliation talks. >> pakistan new prime minister indicated another motivation for opening the supply line. the exit of the u.s. forces from afghanistan. he said in a statement today. >> john: what else request fig do pakistanis get for opening up supply route? >> $1.1 billion in combat support funds that the u.s. frozen and will now process. pakistan's ambassador insisted the agre
we used to say faculty took 80% to. and 200 years ago it makes them in the effective. it is to start on the aspect of the college and university the way academic programs are delivered. you will say a much greater savings. . . for thi hearing. see no objection, mr. duncan, yet no objection to that? i now recognize myself for an opening statement. unmanned aerial systems commonly known as drone has been a game changer for men and women serving in iraq and afghanistan. the systems have provided troops with eyes in the skies have taken the flight to the enemy. to eliminate the most dangerous al qaeda terrorist, drums have increased capabilities to secure our borders and first responders. u.s. customs and border protection began first looking at drums back in 2004, now cvp owns 10 ues aircraft. the systems have been used to surveilled drug smuggler tunnels, videos, burbridge, risk of flooding and assist with the deployment of national guard resources responding to local flooding. cdp has flown missions in support of the border patrol, texas rangers, u.s. service, fbi and
detention facilities across syria, saying they are being used to hold people arrested in government crackdowns since pro-democracy protests started last year. >> the group said it had carried out more than 200 interviews with former detainees, military, and intelligence. almost all of them said the either experienced or witnessed torture. data powerful footage has captured what is said to be the syrian government's deadly shelling of residential areas. a new report details atrocities being committed away from the eyes of the world. >> the syrian authority is running a network of torture centers, a network of torture chambers scattered across syria. the widespread and systematic nature of this network makes it clear that it constitutes a crime against humanity. >> human rights watch interviewed more than 200 former prisoners who told of their experiences in regime torture chambers. >> when we were detained in the military intelligence prison, they hung us by our arms with our bodies suspended in the air. then they beat and taunted us. they put a metal device with a for your prongs' b
nowadays is simply different than it used to be 30 or more years ago because of climate change. >> reporter: not all scientists agree, climate change skeptics argue too much is being read into short-term data and that extreme weather events usually even out over time and don't turn into major trends. but a large majority of climate scientists say climate change is real and, scott, if they're right that means the extreme weather is only going to get worse. >> pelley: chip, thank you. as chip said, the heat is not helping with the wildfires in the west. 45 are burning tonight. tanker planes were cleared to fly again today. they had been grounded far day after an air force tanker crashed, killing four. the number of these firefighting planes is dwindling, and we asked rick sallinger of cbs station kcnc to show us why. >> you don't get much better than that. >> reporter: the specially designed c-130s can cover a quarter mile with 3,000 gallons of water or fire retardant. colonel paul hargrove is with the california air national guard. >> these are probably the most effective in the world just
the u.s. leaves. >> i think the execution of women particularly without due process even with due process it is a crime against humanity and the international community should act accordingly. >> president karzai has strong words but he needs to match the words with action. unless change comes from within afghanistan then we will continue to see more of this. >> is it possible, though? you know, change? i mean, one really hopeful development i saw recently is that the taliban lives and breathes by poppy breeding of poppy plants and turning them into heroin. and there's more they are switching to grow offing of spices which is more lucrative for the farmers. is there any other way to cut the funds to the taliban so that these creeps crawl back into the holes where they belong and die? >> i think the international community can and should put pressure on afghanistan to the extent that we can. but ultimately, there is cause for hope because after this event, over 100 men and women took to the streets of kabul, afghan men and women saying not in our country we demand justice and right
. that's all for us tonight. >>> welcome, everyone. tonight, a keeping them honest special. an investigation into charity cheats. when you open your heart and your wallet to help a charity, how do you know your money will be put to good use? in the next hour, we're going to bring you drew griffin's investigation of the charities accused of collecting millions of dollars in donations and not spending it where donors expect it. one of the charities under scrutiny is called the disabled veterans national foundation. that's their logo, looks very official. dvnf. there is no sign that any of the cash donations, $56 million they have raised over three years, went directly to the men and women who sacrificed so much in war zones, not one dime. because of drew's reporting, the senate finance committee is demanding answers from the dvnf. more on that tonight. drew also uncovered yet another veterans charity called the national veterans foundation, which is taking donations, but using only a very small percentage to actually help vets. there are also charities that claim to help aban
monetary fund says the u.s. economy is recovering, but it's still very fragile. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, armed with an i.m.f. report issued today, christine lagarde warns that u.s. policy-makers must be careful not to overdo debt reduction. >> to bring the debt under control, action needs to be taken over a period of time. that is not just next year. that is going to extend for the next ten years. it needs to be gradual, not so contractionary that the economy folds. >> woodruff: we have an update on efforts across the country to recover from wildfires, extreme heat, and power outages. >> brown: susan dentzer of the journal "health affairs" answers questions many of you are asking about how health care reform will work, now that the supreme court has weighed in. >> for somebody who is running a small business, what does this new health care plan... how does that impact future busess owners? >> brown: margaret warner interviews mexico's new president-elect, enrique peÑa nieto, about drug war violence and relations with th
but the money trail led somewhere else entirely. baghdad pups is used to reunite military animals but they don't do that at all. in the montreal spca, a canadian charity, received about $13 million in donations over three years but despite all of that money, they've ended up in the hole more than $4.5 million. all of these charities have one thing in common. they all have connections to a fundraising company called quadriga art. the company gets paid to build mailing lists. that's where the money trail took drew. getting answers along the way was another. >> hi, how are you. >> we're for the going to be doing anything on camera. >> bottom line, you're not going to give me an interview? >> where is the money going? >> he's not in? >> here's the question. over three years and none of the money has gone to any veterans. ma'am? >> you think if the money was going where they said it was going and everything was on the up and up, they'd want to be completely transparent, right? drew has been investigating this for years in some cases, and they are refusing to answer. literally getting d
the longest and strongest heat wave ever recorded. molly is braving the temperatures. and bringing us more. >> the excessive heat is nothing to mess with. it is in the 110's here in washington. and from the midwest to the plains, and to the east, there are eight deaths officials say because of the high heat. three in ohio and three in wisconsin and two in tennessee. here in dc, a city built over a wamp and why they feel so darn muggy. a lot of people bring the family to see the monuments and some say it is not so bad. a number of the tourist tried to get out early and stay cool including a honeymooning couple. >> what they want to do even if it is hot. we embraced it. >> we have a bunch of kids that are sleeping back in the hotel and it is too hot for them. we came out and we'll go back and pick them up. >> we'll tough it out. >> we have many monuments that we can before we melt. >> as for the power situation in the midatlantic, 10,000 people are in the dark with no air conditioning after the powerful thunderstorms a week ago. most of them. more than 9000, of the 10,000 people are in the b
. anyone can sell guns to those who regularly use the arms to kill their own people. >> how many guns had he got on you? >> 43. >> how many bananas? only to that, because that is regulated. >> justin brand. we'll speak with amnesty usa executive director suzanne nossel. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. at least 25 people have been killed and more than 50 wounded in a car bombing in the iraqi city of diwaania. crowdedack targeted a crowd o market. with sectarian attacks on the rise, at least 237 people were killed in iraq last month, making june 1 of the bloodiest since u.s. forces withdrew late last year. syrian president bashar al-assad has expressed regret for the downing of a turkish air jet that stoked tensions with neighboring turkey last month. speaking to a turkish newspaper, al-assad said he will not allow the incident to escalate into combat between the two countries. in other syria news, dozens of members of syria's opposition met in cairo on monday to formulate a new transition from al-assad's
>> good morning, everyone. thank you so much for joining us. >> it is independence day. wednesday, july 4th and thanks for watching "fox & friends" first. now, we want you throughout the world to send us over your patriotic pictures and tell us exactly how you plan to celebrate the day to us. you can shoot us an e-mail at friendsfirst at foxnews.com and keep them coming throughout the hour. >> absolutely. now it's time for your five at 5:00, the top five stories making news for you at this hour. nearly 1.3 million across seven states and washington, d.c. remain without power. it is now the fifth day that they're without electricity after deadly storms. crews working around the clock to help restore power in unbearable heat and more bad weather expected to hit parts of the east coast later today. >> on the eve of the fourth of july, a fireworks explosion causing the back deck of a new hampshire home to go up in flames overnight. >> and i saw the cloud, i knew it couldn't be done so i came down and the feeling in my stomach so i knew something couldn't be right. i was hoping someb
through our region. the entire area remains under a thunderstorm watch. thanks for joining us at 6 i am will thomas. let's get right to it. gwen tolbart is in the weather center tracking the storms. >> it has been a very busy afternoon will. the storms started firing up into the early afternoon hours, areas to the northwest and have become fairly widespread as the system pushes through to the south and southeast. let's begin with a look at radar all centered around that frontal system you see there, that system being the trigger for everything happening coming into our warm, humid air mass across the region, causing things to fire up. we have a severe thunderstorm watch for the entire viewing area, in effect until 10. let's go to sentinel radarrings on max one for you here, you can see we have a little bit of an area to the south, just seems to be now like it is really firing up a lot. a little bit of upper level rotation, that definitely is worth watching and then as we take a closer look towards the northeast, we are talking about areas that definitely have hail alert s with them and
. >>> in the line of fire, our reporters caught in the center of a fire fight as the u.s. back afghan army fights off the taliban with our troops preparing to withdraw, how ready is this army to stand alone? >>> this is "nightline," july 5, 2012. >> good evening. i'm terry moran. it was the plain that simply vanished. air france flight 447 bound from brazil to paris crashed in the at lanic ocean killing the 228 people on board. today, after a three-year investigation t official reports frightening conclusion the pilots could have saved that plane but did not know how tow. the report reaches a conclusion very similar to our investigation that we aired last month thon broadcast. now and elizabeth vargas takes us back to that night in june, 2009. >> reporter: it is three and ap half hours into the flight, almost 11:00 p.m. and the airplane is still cruising at 37,000 feet when captain mark, a veteran pilot makes a fateful decision. >> it was air bus 8330 is heading into a thunderstorm off the coast of brazil, he gets up tow take a scheduled rest break. >> where on an a 330 does the captain go? >> on
>>> on the broadcast tonight, on the record mitt romney sits down with us one-on-one trying to set things straight after an ugly war of words over his business career. chemical weapons on the move in syria. where are they headed and why? u.s. officials are concerned as the violence there explodes. two weeks out and a lot of opening jitters in london. a massive show of force before the games begin. and here at home, growing controversy over those american olympic uniforms made in china. tonight the folks at ralph lauren are announcing a change. and making a difference for children in some of the toughest places on earth. a one woman dynamo still going strong at 90. a one woman dynamo still going strong at 90. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. mitt romney planned all along to run for president based on his private sector business experience. at the same time the obama campaign has had months to prepare an attack on mitt romney based on just that his private sector business experience. just today this issue and romney's past in
troops leave. afghan president hamid karzai, u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton and u.n. secretary-general ban ki-moon will be among those attending the meeting on sunday. japanese officials are trying to negotiate a total package of $15 billion by 2015. the amount is expected to meet a request president karzai made. he wants the money for reconstruction and development after nato troops leave his country in 2014. >>> an afghan minister outlined where some of that funding will go in a speech ahead of sunday's meeting. wais barmak says continued international support is needed to revive his country's rural areas. barmak is the minister for rural rehabilitation and development. he made his appeal friday at a symposium in tokyo. >> major challenges remain. residual conflict continues to delay and destruct development, growth and peace building. >> barmak says access to drinking water and medical services has improved in some villages, but he insists $125 million will be necessary for the next three years to build water supply systems and schools. barmak adds if the afghan people were
that a great deal of us waste hundreds of millions of dollars of our charitable dollars intended to help veterans is being squandered and wasted by opportunists and individuals and companies that seek -- see it as a profit-making opportunity. >> reporter: daniel borochoff runs a charity watchdog group out of this office in chicago. he grades charities on just how much good and bad they do with your donations. veterans and military charities are some of the worst, he says. and that includes the disabled veterans national foundation, which he gives an f. because hardly any of the donations make it to the people the group is fund-raising for. so back to that $56 million the group has raised. if it hasn't gone to direct contributions to veterans, where exactly did it go? >> as far as we can tell, up to the tenth floor of this manhattan office building to a company called quadriga arts, a company that specializes in fund-raising. and as far as we know, they know a lot about fund-raising for itself. it is a private company which according to its website raises money for more than 500 charities
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with former u.s. secretary of state colin powell. the decorated four-star general has a new book that focuses on the lessons he learned along the way about life and leadership. the new book is called "it worked for me." will talk about the american wars abroad, the crisis in syria, and the 2012 presidential race, of course. we are glad you could join us. the conversation colin powell, coming up right now. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we allit's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: it is an honor to welcome colin powell back to this program. the former secretary of state and decorated four-star general is a best-selling author, whose latest book is called "it worked for me." he joins us from washington. secretary colin powell, good to have you back. >> good to be here, tavis. tavis: and a s
for joining us . we'll see you. everybody have a great weekend. >> extreme heat and humidity is more than an inconvenience but deadly. heat related deaths continue to climb. the country is suffering through triple-digit temperatures and storms nation. i am uma. america's news headquarter in the nation's capitol starts right now. leading our show. heat wave that is gripping the country. rick is tracking the temperatures and live in the extreme weather center. rick. >> it is hot and take a look at the map. you can see where the heat is. 98 degrees in kansas city . 95 in cleave - cleveland it is hot and humid . this is what it like. 110 in clef lend and 106 in louisville. we are not even in the noon time. it is warm temperatures already . because of that heat advisory in the great lakes and ohio river valley and stretching out in parts of the middle atlantic states . we are talking about temps and around 110 today . one of those days to stay in. there are changes in store. it is going to drop our teches. as it does happen. it will swipe down here through today and bring a wind and hail threa
was trying to kick start economy. thanks for inviting us into your home. fair and balanced and unafraid. enjoy independence day. we'll be here so please tune in. fox report is next. >> a show of force in the nuclear standoff with iran. the pentagon bolstering our military power in the region as tensions continued to rise and iran tests a missile said to be capable of hitting israel. plus, keeping our southern borders safe with a new fleet of armored gun boats. >> people that we go up against the drug cartels they have unlimited money and unlimited firepower. >> tonight, lock and load on the riogrande. >> and the death of television legend andy griffith. >> i don't blame you with all that lip lim stick all over your face, you do look kind of swreet >> an entertainment icon. >> a diplomatic breakthrough concerning the war in afghanistan. >> john: the pakistani government reopening critical supply routes after white house said it was sorry 24 troops died in an air strike. they closed the routes into afghanistan. they used the routes to get supplies to troops on the front line.
a sign. tell us about the sign. it's an acrho anyone, pray for everyone, rely on god for comfort, always seem faith, you are not alone. we will not live in fear. >> reporter: why did you want to come here and bring the sign? >> we're part of the community. i'm a parent. it could have been my kids. you know, it's the grace of god that my baby's name is not on there. we wanted to show our love and support for our community, and that we are -- we are supportive and not going to let this change us. >> reporter: i think suzanne, that's the spirit i felt. people have been coming by. there's a prior circle going on. people have been coming by, and i've had heard that throughout the community, that people will not give into the darkness of this event, they'll not give into fear, live positively and try to remember the good things about these victims and forget as much as they can about the suspect. suzanne? >> we serb responsibility their efforts 689 jim, thank you so much. >>> new life emerges from the tragedy. even as the victims of shootings struggle how to recover, the wife of one of the vic
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,050 (some duplicates have been removed)